Monday, October 6, 2014

Butterscotch Cake with Caramel Icing


I found this Butterscotch cake in a collection of my Great-Grandmother's old recipe cards. I love to try out these vintage recipes, because they are often for goodies that nobody seems to make anymore. I have never heard of Butterscotch cake, so I thought I'd try it out. Pairing it with the caramel icing (a separate recipe found among the old cards) was my idea - I have no idea which frosting she would have put with this cake. I love the icing even more than the cake itself, and I think next time I will try it with a standard butter cake.

Caramel Icing is a wonderful treat and another one of those old things that fell out of favor but now is making a comeback. It actually tastes more like penuche or praline candy than the gooey caramel we think of nowadays. It dries and sets into a coating that is very different from other types of frosting - not fluffy or creamy, but almost like a thin layer of brown sugar fudge on a cake!

Butterscotch Cake:

2 Cups Brown Sugar
1/2 Cup Butter
1 teaspoon vanilla
2 Eggs
2 Cups Flour
1 teaspoon Baking Soda
1 teaspoon Baking Powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 Cup Buttermilk

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease and flour (or line with parchment) two 9" or three 6" round pans.

Cream the butter and sugar with an electric mixer on medium until fluffy. Add vanilla, then add eggs one at a time, beating on low just until they are mixed in.

In a separate bowl, sift together the flour, baking soda, baking powder and salt. Starting with the flour mixture, add the flour and the buttermilk (alternating one then the other) into the sugar/egg mixture on low speed. When everything is mixed in, scrape down the bowl by hand.

Pour batter into the pans and bake for 25-30 minutes, until a toothpick inserted in the middle comes out clean.

Cool before frosting.

Caramel Icing:

1 1/2 cups Brown Sugar
1 Tablespoon flour
1/4 Cup butter (plus 2 tablespoons for later)
1/4 Cup Milk
1 teaspoon vanilla

In a small saucepan, mix together all ingredients except the vanilla and the extra 2 Tablespoons of butter. Heat over medium and bring to a boil. Stirring frequently to prevent burning, let the mixture boil for a good one minute. (I actually use a candy thermometer and let it reach 238 degrees, but if you don't have one, just make sure you boil it for a good solid minute).

Take off the fire and add in the vanilla and the 2 Tablespoons butter. Cool the mixture, occasionally giving it a vigorous stir, until it is still warm (but not HOT) and has thickened enough to spread. Spread it over the cake, moving fairly quickly because it will set as it cools. It will be a thin coating, not a thick layer. Let it set completely before cutting into the cake.

Enjoy!








21 comments:

  1. Ive added this one to my favourites

    ReplyDelete
  2. Does this need to be refrigerated?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No, this does not need to be refrigerated.

      Delete
  3. and it's definitely only a half cup of sugar?

    ReplyDelete
  4. butter ... I meant half cup of butter ... sorry!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Is this cake made with All purpose flour?

    ReplyDelete
  6. Pls specify what type of flour..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is all-purpose flour. I will make that clear, Myna, thanks!

      Delete
    2. It is all-purpose flour. I will make that clear, Myna, thanks!

      Delete
  7. Hi Christa, thank you for this recipie! Is this cake suitable to be covered with fondant on top? You say that the caramel will thicken as it cools so I am imagining it to be like ganache.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The cake itself would be fine for fondant, but this icing is not ideal. It is very different from other icings in that it has a texture almost like praline candy - it dries hard and there is a little grittiness that is still present from the brown sugar. It is not as creamy and smooth as a ganache. Hope that helps!

      Delete
  8. Hi Christa! This looks great. I'm not sure if my comment from earlier didn't go through at all or simply hasn't shown up because you haven't approved it yet, but in case it just never went through, I thought I would post it again. Basically I really want to try it, but I was wondering whether the frosting hardens a lot when cooled like a penuche or if the inside still stays slightly soft? Please let me know when you have a chance. Very happy to have discovered your blog -- already pinned quite a few recipes to try!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Six Bittersweets,
      I did not see an earlier comment from you, I'm sorry.

      The icing is kind of hard like penuche or pralines. Not hard hard, like royal icing, but not soft either.

      Delete
  9. I have made this cake twice using the 9" cake pan and both times it has fallen in the middle. I have not added or subtracted anything. I am an experienced baker and can't figure out what has happened. The taste is delicious, the cake rises beautifully but then falls in the last 5 minutes of baking. Thoughts?

    ReplyDelete
  10. I also made this cake and it completely collapsed in the middle - similar to Anonymous' experience.

    The taste was fine but the texture was very gummy.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I just made it too and mine fell also.

      Delete
    2. Thank you for commenting. I am going to remove this recipe since so many people are having trouble with it. When I have time to troubleshoot the recipe and figur out what I've done wrong in the instructions, I will put it back online.

      Delete
  11. Thank you for the feedback, I need to investigate and see what might be happening. Perhaps I should take the recipe down until I can troubleshoot it. I have not had that happen when I make it, but obviously there is a problem somewhere with the recipe on my end if this keeps happening. Thanks again!

    ReplyDelete
  12. Hi Christa,
    I am wanting to make this recipe. Did you troubleshoot the recipe yet? Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  13. Thank you for this delicious cake...we LOVE IT!!!!

    ReplyDelete